The Short Life of Dreamland and its Japanese Cafe

coney island fin

coney island back fin

There was really no reason for the sender to write anything on this postcard sent in 1907 to Miss Katie Krunkle of Lancaster, Penna.  –  the picture says it all. It says Hey! I’m HERE! I’m in Coney Island!!! And what better place to be in 1907!

Coney Island was at its height of popularity at the time – it was the place to go for fun and surprising amusements – one of which was the Japanese Cafe illustrated above.

It’s seriously doubtful that sushi was served here . . . what exactly was served I haven’t been able to discover yet – but the guests were served by traditionally garbed servers.

Dreamland itself has a story full of bold strokes. It was built in 1904 and burnt to the ground in 1911. A short life, and it appears as it it were quite fully lived.

There may not have been miso soup – but there were  hot dogs!

And at the end of the evening, the beautiful lights . . .

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7 thoughts on “The Short Life of Dreamland and its Japanese Cafe

  1. I have a serious THING about Coney Island. I don’t ever want to go there, because I have this vision of what Coney Island was like in the 20’s and it would just ruin it. I love looking at the old pictures, though, and thinking what it must have been like.

  2. I’m still hoping to find the menu from the Japanese cafe . . . that would really be fun to see, I think. 🙂

  3. The investment in it lost was huge, Sheila. The fire was so intense that people were coming from other parts of the city on the subway to see what was going on . . .

    I read somewhere that a new place called ‘Dreamland’ was opened in Coney Island – not an amusement park but a skating rink of sorts if I remember correctly. It wasn’t doing too well.

    Coney Island itself sunk into being a not too great place for a while, but developers and the city of NY are now anxious to get in there and really make it into a glittering new place. Lots of people for it, lots of people against it. It will be interesting to see what transpires. 🙂

  4. Pingback: The Merman and the Hungry Seamen via Fook Woh & Co. « ~Postcards From The Dinner Table~

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